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The official student newspaper of Walter Johnson High School

The Pitch

The official student newspaper of Walter Johnson High School

The Pitch

The official student newspaper of Walter Johnson High School

The Pitch

Message Megan: A Weighty Issue

Message Megan: A Weighty Issue

Dear Megan,

I am concerned about a friend of mine who has started a diet. She is worried about her weight and counts the calories in everything she eats even though she isn’t overweight. I know it’s not an eating disorder right now, but I’m afraid it may lead to one. Should I tell an adult? Do you have any advice for me?

Sincerely,

A Concerned Friend

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Dear Concerned Friend,

You definitely have to be careful here. It is okay for one to alter his or her eating habits as long as they c0ntinue to meet  her nutritional needs in addition a healthy amount of exercise.

The definition of diet, according to a 2004 article published by the Canadian Paediatric Society, is “an intentional, often temporary, change in eating to achieve weight loss,” though the article also notes that diet is “poorly defined.”

The article states that there are many different kinds of diets, ranging from healthy to unhealthy. A healthy diet may include eliminating junk food and consuming healthier products, while an unhealthy diet may be more serious, and contain unhealthy eating habits, which include skipping meals, drastically cutting calories, or self-induced vomiting, to name a few. However, it is difficult to explicity categorize or define healthy and unhealthy diets, as each person untaking a diet has a different Body Mass Index (BMI), current level of health, specific needs and reason for dieting. All of these factors, and more, are necessary when evaluating a diet or potential destructive behavior.

The best thing you can do right now is to be a supportive friend. Encourage her to talk about what’s going on in her life and be a good listener. If you feel the need, confront your friend about her diet, but do not openly accuse her of anything or imply that she has a problem. If, after you talk, you feel your friend is either in denial about her diet or think she needs further help, please tell a trusted adult. When in doubt, trust your gut and tell someone. You know your friend better than I do, and if you have concerns about her behavior, they are probably valid. For more information, visit the links below:

http://www.eatingdisorderfoundation.org/EDFFAQ.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2720870/

 

Sincerely,

Megan

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About the Contributor
Megan Chun
Megan Chun, Online Editor-in-Chief
This is senior Megan Chun’s third year on The Pitch staff, and her second consecutive year as the Online Editor-in-Chief. She is excited to continue her work on The Pitch Online with the new group of online editors. Megan’s activities (besides procrastinating and editing online blurbs) include Irish dancing, drinking smoothies, color-coding her closet, taking naps and watching cop dramas. Megan is eager to work with co-editors Emily and Claudia, in addition to the rest of the great 2013-2014 Pitch staff.
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