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The Pitch

The official student newspaper of Walter Johnson High School

The Pitch

The official student newspaper of Walter Johnson High School

The Pitch

The history of Mardi Gras

The+history+of+Mardi+Gras

The concept of Mardi Gras has been derived from a celebration In 1827 by a group of students in New Orleans, Louisiana who brought back a cultural tradition from Paris where they danced through the streets of New Orleans in big, colorful costumes.

Just 10 years later, New Orleans would grow to be a location of the famous Mardi Gras parades that filled the streets of the city.

To this day, the parade happens every year in late February or early March; grand marching bands and large, decorated floats travel down the streets as people storm the parade path to celebrate this adopted holiday.

The holiday was developed to be celebrated as a prelude to Lent, a Christian holiday, and occurs between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday.

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The holiday has become widely popular under the colors gold, green and purple which are incorporated into the beads and other trinkets thrown into the crowds from the formal colored floats through the duration of the parade, in addition to many wearing masks and boas.

Many people incorporate big parties into the holiday in which there is a common tradition of an important dessert: The King Cake.

The King Cake is a cinnamon bun-like cake which is twisted among bread and cinnamon, and then frosted into a colorful three section cake presented with the colors purple, gold and green to symbolize the holiday. King Cakes are different from average cake as they hold a tiny plastic or porcelain baby inside.

The person who is lucky enough to receive the piece of cake with the figure inside is said to have good luck until the next Mardi Gras festival and has the honor of hosting the following year’s Mardi Gras party.

People around the country go to New Orleans for the big celebration every year, as Louisiana is the only state where the true celebration of Mardi Gras is a legal holiday.

However, this widespread celebration doesn’t prevent other cities, such as Mobile and St. Louis, from celebrating the holiday in a more subtle, yet celebratory fashion in the form of festivals or concerts.

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About the Contributor
Izzy McMullen, Editor In Chief
This is senior Izzy McMullen’s third year writing for The Pitch. She is the Online Editor in Chief for The Pitch Online. She was a Online Co-Assistant Feature Section Editor the past 2 years and enjoyed it as well. She additionally has participated on both her club and high school lacrosse team for the past 4 years at WJ, and 6 years for her MC Elite Club team. In her free time she enjoys hanging out with friends, helping with club P.R.O.V.I.D.E, as well as working at a local candy store in Bethesda. She hopes to continue to help the The Pitch thrive throughout the upcoming year.
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